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Stimulant medication may improve driving in ADHD young adults

Young adults taking stimulant medication had significantly improved driving performance on a simulator compared to the placebo group. Also, it was found that there was no significant differences in driving performances between atomoxetine (Strattera, a non-stimulant) and placebo.

ADHD rating scale scores were decreased by at least 30 percent in 80% of the group that took stimulant medication, while the rating scale scores decreased by at least 30 percent in only 40% of the atomoxetine (Strattera) group.

Kay, G. Michaels, M., & Pakull, B. (2009). Simulated Driving Changes in Young Adults With ADHD Receiving Mixed Amphetamine Salts Extended Release and Atomoxetine. Journal of Attention Disorders, 12(4), 316-329.

Read article abstract here

By | 2016-10-05T06:46:12+00:00 January 7th, 2009|Categories: ADHD, Medication, Research|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Stimulant medication may improve driving in ADHD young adults

About the Author:

Dr. Stephanie Sarkis is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC), and AMHCA Diplomate and Clinical Specialist in Child and Adolescent Counseling based in Tampa Bay, Florida, where she specializes in the treatment of ADD/ADHD. Dr. Sarkis conducts evaluations, testing, diagnosis, and counseling services. She also is a public speaker, consultant, coach, and is a facilitator in collaborative law.