/Tag:Research

Research

Online Questionnaire for Moms of ADHD Kids 5-13 years old

By | 2016-10-05T06:45:48+00:00 May 13th, 2011|Categories: ADD, ADHD, Research|Tags: , , |

My name is Erica Merson and I am doctoral student from University of Maryland, College Park. I am conducting a research study to learn more about the experiences of mothers of children with ADHD to eventually use this knowledge to improve the understanding and treatment of families of children with ADHD. I am contacting you because [...]

Comments Off on Online Questionnaire for Moms of ADHD Kids 5-13 years old

ADHD: Brain Structure Differences Found

By | 2017-01-10T08:41:40+00:00 April 26th, 2011|Categories: ADD, ADHD, Brain, Research|Tags: , , , , , , |

Did you know that the ADHD brain may have a thinner cerebral cortex than the non-ADHD brain? The cerebral cortex is the thin tissue that covers the cerebrum. It's the cerebrum's outer layer. It's sometimes called the "gray matter" of the brain. In an American Journal of Psychiatry editorial, Rachel G. Klein Ph.D. reviews studies regarding [...]

Psychologists closing in on causes of claustrophobic fear

By | 2016-11-20T07:53:45+00:00 April 14th, 2011|Categories: Brain, Depression/Anxiety, Research|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

ScienceDaily (2011-04-13) -- We all move around in a protective bubble of "near space," more commonly known as "personal space." But not everyone's bubble is the same size. People who project their personal space too far beyond their bodies, or the norm of arm's reach, are more likely to experience claustrophobic fear, a new study finds. [...]

Comments Off on Psychologists closing in on causes of claustrophobic fear

Happy Children Make Happy Adults

By | 2017-03-11T10:12:29+00:00 February 25th, 2011|Categories: Relationships, Research, School|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

ScienceDaily (2011-02-25) -- Being a "happy" teenager is linked to increased well-being in adulthood, new research finds. Using information from 2776 individuals who participated in the 1946 British birth cohort study, the scientists tested associations between having a positive childhood and well-being in adulthood. A 'positive' childhood was based on teacher evaluations of students' levels of [...]

Kids with Migraines: Their Mental Health is Fine

By | 2016-10-05T06:45:49+00:00 February 18th, 2011|Categories: Depression/Anxiety, Parenting, Research|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

In a study by Bruijn, et al. (2010), it was found that compared to healthy children, children with migraines: * do not exhibit more withdrawn behavior * do not have more thought problems * do not have more social problems * do not exhibit more delinquent or aggressive behavior * are not more frequently diagnosed with [...]

Study: Why do men use silly pickup lines?

By | 2016-10-05T06:45:49+00:00 February 17th, 2011|Categories: Dating, Gender, Relationships|Tags: , , , , , , , |

World-Science.net 14 Jan 2011 -- "Pickup" lines based on humor tend to fall flat-but they do get the speakers rat­ed as rel­a­tively fun­ny and so­cia­ble, and aren't dis­fa­vored by wom­en seek­ing brief li­ais­ons, a new study sug­gests. The pair stud­ied the ef­fects of "flip­pant" lines such as "can I get a pic­ture of you so I [...]

Comments Off on Study: Why do men use silly pickup lines?

Alcohol’s disruptive effects on sleep may be more pronounced among women

By | 2016-10-05T06:45:49+00:00 February 16th, 2011|Categories: Addiction, Gender, Research|Tags: , , , , , |

ScienceDaily (2011-02-15) -- Researchers have known for decades that alcohol can initially deepen sleep during the early part of the night but then disrupt sleep during the latter part of the night; this is called a "rebound effect." A new study of the influence of gender and family history of alcoholism on sleep has found that [...]

Comments Off on Alcohol’s disruptive effects on sleep may be more pronounced among women

Sideline test accurately detects athletes’ concussions in minutes, study shows

By | 2016-10-05T06:45:50+00:00 February 4th, 2011|Categories: Brain, Research, Sports|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

ScienceDaily (2011-02-03) -- A simple test performed at the sideline of sporting events can accurately detect concussions in athletes, according to a new study. Current sideline tests can leave a wide amount a brain function untested following concussion. Researchers showed that this simple test was superior to current methods and accurately and reliably identified athletes with [...]

Comments Off on Sideline test accurately detects athletes’ concussions in minutes, study shows

For the First Time, DNA Sequencing Technology Saves A Child’s Life

By | 2016-11-20T07:53:47+00:00 January 10th, 2011|Categories: News, Research|Tags: , , |

From Popular Science By Clay Dillow Posted 01.06.2011 at 1:08 pm For the First Time, DNA Sequencing Technology Saves A Child's Life Proponents of genetic medicine say DNA sequencing is the future of medicine and that soon every truly sick person will have his or her genome sequenced. Critics cite privacy concerns and note that genetic [...]

Comments Off on For the First Time, DNA Sequencing Technology Saves A Child’s Life

Border collie comprehends over 1,000 object names

By | 2016-10-05T06:45:50+00:00 January 8th, 2011|Categories: Dogs, Research|Tags: , , , , , , |

ScienceDaily (2011-01-06) -- Researchers at Wofford College discovered that a border collie comprehends the names of over 1,000 objects, differentiating between names of objects and orders to fetch them. This research deepens the findings of researchers in Germany, who had discovered a dog that knew the names of a couple of hundred objects. Important questions were [...]

Comments Off on Border collie comprehends over 1,000 object names